Swimming Pool Builder - Swimming Pool Contractor

When it comes to pool construction, people have questions in the difference between shotcrete swimming pool construction and gunite swimming pool construction. While they are both concrete based applications, the process for each construction style is different.

In shotcrete swimming pool construction, concrete, or in rare instances mortar, is transported through a pressure hose and pneumatically projected onto a surface at a high velocity. Using the shotcrete process, the force at which the concrete is projected from the nozzle means compaction and placement occur at the same time. It can be embedded onto any surface, with overhead and vertical areas included.

Gunite swimming pool construction is a dry mix process, wherein the concrete is in a dry state when it is blown through the hose, then the nozzle injects water onto the concrete directly before the application. Using gunite allows a pool to be designed and shaped into any style that someone prefers.

In shotcrete swimming pool construction, steel is used to reinforce the shape of the pool, helping to hold the shotcrete structure of the pool together. A single piece shotcrete shell is formed for the pool, and the final shape of the pool is trimmed out by the workers. The tile and coping around the pool then has to be installed. The waterproofing surface, which is normally plaster, will then be applied after the surface has been prepared and cleaned. After this is done the final steps of the construction of the pool can be completed, such as installing pumps and filters, electrical work, deck installation, and the starting up of the filtration equipment.

In gunite swimming pool construction, you can have your pool shaped any way you like. Once deciding on a shape, a wooden frame is normally used to outline the shape of the pool. Once the homeowner confirms that the outline is correct for the shape they requested, a steel rebar is used to hold the shape into place. The gunite is then power sprayed into the pool and is what actually makes the pool. Plumbing fittings are then installed, and colorful pebbles, stone, or even mosaic tiles can be added to give the pool the look that is wanted. The pools floor and walls then get installed.

Homeowners who have a specific vision of their pool that requires a special shape are more likely to use gunite swimming pool construction. This process is more conducive to adding things such as designs or colors to a pool. Gunite accommodates itself exceptionally well to free-form pools, steps and decks.

While both shotcrete swimming pool construction and gunite swimming pool construction use concrete to form the pool, it is the way that it is applied that is the difference in their processes. Which process is the best depends on the individual and their plans for the design of the pool.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

After the design and price are agreed upon, the contract is written up. Pool Captain immediately sends the plans to the surveyor, and gathers needed documents for permitting. Here is a brief overview of what to expect in terms of how the process moves along.

Remember, each pool is different, so this may vary depending upon the size and complexity of your particular job.

1. Permitting. Six weeks to Eight weeks after we receive the permit back from your City or County, you are swimming!

2. Layout pool. Outline pool with wood framing to match the print shape. Any fence panels needed to be removed to gain access are removed.

3. Dig. A backhoe digs the pool, and workers hand shape the walls. Payment Draw Due.

4. Steel. Wire mesh and steel rebar is placed in the pool hole for reinforcement creating a basket like structure.

5. Preliminary Plumbing.Any plumbing that will not be accessible after the concrete is sprayed is installed now. This includes things like the main drains, any floor cleaners or caretakers, wall jets and returns, faountains, etc.

6. Shoot Gunite. High PSI concrete is sprayed into pool shape covering “wire basket” like structure. Walls will be approx. 6” thick when completed this stage, and floor approx. 12” thick. Payment Draw Due.

7.Pre-grade. Any extra dirt removed from the pool hole has been removed, forms are removed and deck area is graded.

8. Plumbing.2” plumbing pipes are run from the pool to the equipment location. All lines are connected and the contractor runs a pressure check to be certain there are no air leaks (any air leaks would become water leaks once water is added to the pool. Cover in- ground plumbing with dirt.

9. Form Deck. Perimeter of deck, any steps or risers and planters are framed with wood.

10. Form Deck. Perimeter of deck is formed with wood. Plumbing is covered. Deck drains are installed.

11. Set Tile. Waterline tile is applied.

12.Power. Electricity is run to the equipment, panel is set, deck is grounded, light is installed, and equipment is hooked up.

13. Pour Concrete Deck. Concrete Decking is poured as 4” slab with drainage and pitch. Payment Draw Due.

14. Apply Deck Top. Acrylic texture is applied or pavers are set.

15. Screen Enclosure. Aluminum screen enclosure is built on site.

16. Clean-up. Your pool is almost finished! The sub-pumps are turned on and the interior of the pool shell is cleaned with an acid wash.

17. Interior Finish Applied. Marcite or exposed aggregate finish is applied. Final Payment Due.

18. Fill with Water. This may take up to 2 days.

19. Start-Up. Chemicals are added to balance the water chemistry, pump is turned on, pool is cleaned. It is important that

20. Sod, Seed, & Landscaping. Any grass or landscaping destroyed during construction is replaced per contract and yard is cleaned up. Any fence removed for access is replaced.

21. Pool School Begins. One day a week for 4 weeks, the owner and builder representative meet in order for the new owner to learn how to use all of the pools equipment.

22. Go Swimming!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS